Person-centred Planning and Lifestyle Supports

Over the past few years, and especially in the last few months, I have been reflecting upon my experience of shared supported accommodation. Some experiences I have encountered within the service provision has developed a distinctive grey area. My own thinking, trying to get these events in some sort of focus, has mainly been done from my perspective as an individual pragmatist. I live within an environment where, in order to survive, I am dependent on standardised practices.

Continue reading “Person-centred Planning and Lifestyle Supports”

What’s Next?

I wrote and published this article on OnlineOpinion over 11 years ago. It is troubling to me that nothing much has changed over all that time.

I am still trying, even though I’ve got 1/4 of the abilities I had back then in 2008. That means now, I am constantly pushing the boundaries of my remaining abilities to speak against injustices. I want to achieve so much in a personal, social and academic sense and all I ask is to be given the opportunity to do so.

Continue reading “What’s Next?”

Another burden on my communication

Under the current disability support system that I am a part of, my support provider receives a sum of money from the NDIS, known as the ‘SIL’ (Supported Independent Living). They may have been allocated quite a large amount of money, but as I experience it they treat me in a very flippant manner.

Continue reading “Another burden on my communication”

A ONE SIZE FITS ALL POLICY DOESN’T FIT ANYONE

In seeking to treat all people with the same level of care and compassion, is it right to expect an equal outcome from all?  Continue reading “A ONE SIZE FITS ALL POLICY DOESN’T FIT ANYONE”

Another possible submission to the Royal Commission

NOTE: This is another one of my short articles that, among other things, gives expression to some or other aspect of my condition and the difficulties I face in getting these matters corrected. In previous articles about my physiology my concern is to describe the kind of progressive reduction that comes about under a degenerative muscular condition such as Friedreich’s Ataxia. Here I focus upon a problem with technology and how the problem interacts with my disability. I hope these articles can be helpful to others undergoing similar circumstances and assist carers and family members to devise creative strategies to overcome the persistent frustrations (P.G) Continue reading “Another possible submission to the Royal Commission”

The independence of Friedreich’s Ataxia and its relationship with deteriorating muscle spasms.

The following is from a study was published in The Journal of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery:

“About 11-15% of patients with Friedreich’s Ataxia experience painful muscle spasms or muscle contractions, but little is known about the underlying processes that cause this complication.” Continue reading “The independence of Friedreich’s Ataxia and its relationship with deteriorating muscle spasms.”

The Independence of Friedreich’s Ataxia and its Relationship to Scoliosis and Cardiomyopathy

August 7th 2017: Friedreich Ataxia’s News included the following definitions for Scoliosis and Heart disease—

Scoliosis

Weakened core and leg muscles can lead to aggressive scoliosis or curvature of the spine in many patients.

Heart disease

Around three-quarters of people with Friedreich’s ataxia will develop some form of heart disease, usually hypertrophic cardiomyopathy which is when the heart muscle becomes thickened.”

Continue reading “The Independence of Friedreich’s Ataxia and its Relationship to Scoliosis and Cardiomyopathy”

The relationship between Nystagmus and my individualistic style of Friedreich’s Ataxia

Below is a definition of Nystagmus as derived from Wikipedia:

Nystagmus is a condition of involuntary (or voluntary, in rare cases) eye movement, acquired in infancy or later in life, that may result in reduced or limited vision. Due to the involuntary movement of the eye, it has been called “dancing eyes”.
Continue reading “The relationship between Nystagmus and my individualistic style of Friedreich’s Ataxia”

Job on a Dunghill

My time in shared supported accommodation has had a significant impact on the deterioration of my disability. This attains to using the phrase ‘on a dunghill’ as a description of my life in a shared supported facility. This term of expression gives readers an idea of the ugly reality; of the helplessness, immobility, failure to speak and see. The loss of my control and dignity manifests as motivation to change the delivery of care in the disability sector. Continue reading “Job on a Dunghill”